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Summit of the Gross Glockner Pass

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In 1966 Anthony Sargeant and his partner Gill drove down through Europe to spend the summer in what was then still Yugoslavia. The route took them over the stunning Gross Glockner Pass in the Austrian Alps. This photograph was taken at the summit on a warm summer day.

Cast Iron Mangle used on washday in the 1940-50s before the days of washing machines — Tony Anthony J Sargeant — anthonyjsargeanttony

The mother of Anthony Sargeant used a cast iron mangle just like this one on washing day in the 1940-50s. The wooden rollers squeezed much of the water out of the washing so that it could be hung out to dry on the long washing line that ran the length of the garden. Other essential […] […]

via Cast Iron Mangle used on washday in the 1940-50s before the days of washing machines — Tony Anthony J Sargeant — anthonyjsargeanttony

180 Bold Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada — TONY Anthony SARGEANT — anthonyjsargeanttony

Anthony Sargeant rented an apartment on the 21st floor of this building in 1977-78. The apartment was on the west side of the block looking out towards McMaster University Medical Centre (MUMC). Wonderful views from the balcony and splendid sunsets. via 180 Bold Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada — TONY Anthony SARGEANT

via 180 Bold Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada — TONY Anthony SARGEANT — anthonyjsargeanttony

A survivor from the 1960s

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Found in the wardrobe in 2016 by Anthony J Sargeant a wooden coathanger from the 1960s with the label from Woolworths still stuck on after at least 45 years. The price of 1/3d (one shilling and three pence (note d not p) shows that it predates the decimilisation of British currency which took place in February 1971. 1/3d would be the equivalent to 6.25pence in decimalised currency. It was another age of wonderful texture when as children we had to learn arithmetical tasks when there were half-pennys and farthings (pre- 1960) when there were 12d in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound. Moreover weights of everyday items were given in avoirdupois measures (so 16 ounces(oz) in a pound(lb) and 14 pounds in a stone, 8 stones in a hundredweight (cwt) and 20 cwt in a ton. A typical sum at primary school in an arithmetic lesson might involve something like: “Divide  £17 9s  2d into equal amounts among 13 boys. If apples cost 8d a pound how many pounds and ounces of apples would each boy then be able buy from the greengrocer.” I think the answer is 39lbs and 2oz.

Nunhead Cemetery in South London – A haven for wildlife — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Nunhead Cemetery was built by Victorian entrepreneurs to meet the need for burial space in the rapidly growing city where traditional church graveyards were already full. Anthony J Sargeant visited… Source: Nunhead Cemetery in South London – A haven for wildlife

via Nunhead Cemetery in South London – A haven for wildlife — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

The Island at Sibenik in Yugoslavia in 1966

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Sibenik is about halfway up the Adriatic coast of former Yugoslavia (as it was in 1966). It has no beach in the port town itself and so one took a small boat out to the small offshore island which served as the town’s ‘beach’ – although it was not so much a beach (no sand) but a paved esplanade to the water’s edge and behind that a cool Mediterranean conifer hinterland. Tony Sargeant stayed there with Gill Parks for some weeks in the summer of 1966.

The Adriatic coast of Yugoslavia in 1966

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The beautiful coastline of what was ‘Yugoslavia’ in 1966 during a wonderful extended summer holiday. We drove down through Europe and over the Gross Glockner pass and into Yugoslavia. We had an old pale blue Austin A35 van which behaved impeccably throughout apart from repeatedly overheating climbing the Gross Glockner Pass so that we had to keep stopping to let the engine cool down.